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Art Basel in Miami Beach | Top 5 Places To Check Out

Dozens of museums, galleries, satellite fairs, and pop-ups dot the Miami landscape the first week of December.

Miss Rosenby Miss Rosen
Photo: UNTITLED, Miami Beach.

With two-dozen satellite fairs, a host of museums, galleries, and pop-ups across the city, Art Basel in Miami Beach will keep you on your toes all week. Crave spotlights some of our favorite places to check out while you are in town.

Also: Art Basel in Miami Beach | Everything You Need to Know

Christie van der Haak, rendering of exterior of the Wolfsonian-FIU

Christie van der Haak, rendering of exterior of the Wolfsonian-FIU

Christie van der Haak: MORE IS MORE at The Wolfsonian-FIU

Nothing sums up the spirit of Art Basel in Miami Beach better than the phrase, “More is More,” eloquently subverting Mies van der Rohe’s dictum for design in a distinctively American fashion—making it the largest public artwork on display throughout Miami Art Week. Artist Christie van der Haak understands the ethos for the twenty-first century, transforming the Wolsonian’s iconic faced and lobby with textile and batik-inspired patterns that will dazzle the eye and blow the mind. The installation is conceived as a bold response to their current exhibition, Modern Dutch Design, which delights in van der Rohe’s admonition for a quiet, measured response. As van der Haak reveals, “All my work…represents a part of an infinite universe,” luring us into her inner realm, taking us into a place where imagination, beauty, and fantasy convivially mingle and merge.

Photo: Tony Gum

Photo: Tony Gum

PULSE Miami Beach, December 1-4, 2016 at Indian Beach Park

Celebrating its 12th edition, PULSE Miami Beach returns to Indian Beach Park at 46 Street at Collins Avenue in North Beach. Under the guidance of Director Helen Toomer, PULSE presents a dynamic array of galleries from around the world including Crave faves Danziger Gallery, Flowers, Yancey Richardson, Von Lintel Gallery, and #endHIV Campaign, among many others.

Standouts include the work of South African artist Tony Gum, who will be exhibiting her self-portraits at the Cape Town-based Christopher Moller Gallery. Dubbed the “Coolest Girl in South Africa” by Vogue Magazine, Gum combines African aesthetics and Western branding to heightened effect, providing a twenty-first century image of self on the cusp of global domination.

Malick Sidibé Nuit de Noël (Happy Club), 1963, Gelatin silver print Paper: 19,7 x 23,5 in © Malick Sidibé. Courtesy Galerie MAGNIN-A, Paris

Malick Sidibé Nuit de Noël (Happy Club), 1963, Gelatin silver print Paper: 19,7 x 23,5 in © Malick Sidibé. Courtesy Galerie MAGNIN-A, Paris

UNTITLED, Miami Beach, November 30-December 4, 2016 at Ocean Drive and 12th Street

Now in its fifth edition, UNTITLED, Miami Beach puts the sand and surf right under your feet as it is literally located on the water. Under the auspices of Artistic Director Omar López-Chahoud, the fair presents a vibrant mix of galleries, artist-run exhibition spaces, and non—profit organizations from around the globe, striking the perfect balance between all disciplines of contemporary art. Keep an eye out for Crave fave Magnin – A, which co-created Malick Sidibé: The Eye of Modern Mali, the first major solo UK exhibition of the legendary Malian lensman currently on view at Somerset House, London, now through January 5, 2017.

Anselm Kiefer Die Schechina, 2010. Painted resin dress, glass shards, steel, numbered glass discs, and wire in inscribed glass and steel vitrine. 179 x 82.5 x 82.5 inches (455 x 210 x 210 cm) Hall Collection. Courtesy Hall Art Foundation Photography: Charles Duprat © Anselm Kiefer

Anselm Kiefer Die Schechina, 2010. Painted resin dress, glass shards, steel, numbered glass discs, and wire in inscribed glass and steel vitrine. 179 x 82.5 x 82.5 inches (455 x 210 x 210 cm) Hall Collection. Courtesy Hall Art Foundation Photography: Charles Duprat © Anselm Kiefer

Regeneration Series: Anselm Kiefer from the Hall Collection at NSU Art Museum

“Art is longing. You never arrive, but you keep going in the hope that you will,” German artist Anselm Kiefer observes, beautifully articulating the compulsion that drives us to create the world anew. Perhaps this is why we collect: we are looking for the answer that alludes us, that travels across time, from one generation to the next, through the work of art itself. But for that moment when we can possess the work, we imagine the answer might reveal itself if we gaze long enough.

The NSU Art Museum launches Regeneration Series: Anselm Kiefer from the Hall Collection on November 29, 2016, to time with Art Basel in Miami Beach. The exhibition, which continues through August 13, 2017, will include major books, works on paper, paintings, and sculptures from the late 1960s through the present, giving us a powerful look at a body of work that seeks to address issues of identity, history, and mythology in ways that challenge our preconceived ideas of the purpose of art itself.

Photo: Alex Webb. Sancti Spiritus, Cuba, 1993

Photo: Alex Webb. Sancti Spiritus, Cuba, 1993

Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris-Webb: Violet Isles at HistoryMiami Museum

The Miami Street Photography Festival returns to HistoryMiami Museum, a Smithsonian Affiliate, located in the heart of downtown Miami. A perfect counterpoint to the luxurious trappings across the city, the Festival is a celebration of the people, by the people, for the people—showcasing the work of photographers from more than 60 countries.

This year’s featured guests include celebrated photographers Martin Parr, Richard Kalvar, Alex Webb, Rebbeca Norris-Webb, Maggie Steber, Jill Freedman, and Matt Stuart who will be giving talks and presentations throughout the week. At the center of it all is Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris-Webb: Violet Isles, a stunning portrait of Cuba that is a must-see for photography aficionados from all walks of life.


Miss Rosen is a New York-based writer, curator, and brand strategist. There is nothing she adores so much as photography and books. A small part of her wishes she had a proper library, like in the game of Clue. Then she could blaze and write soliloquies to her in and out of print loves.