Weekends in Seattle | Where to Eat, Drink & Be Merry in the Emerald City

You only have two days off! If you don't already have plans, here's what you should do this weekend in beautiful Seattle.

Liz Biscevicby Liz Biscevic
Photo: Photo: Andrew E. Larsen/Flickr Creative Commons.

Seattle, Washington is a city that offers everything from bomb food and a lively nightlife to beautiful hikes and sleepy towns. It’s the kind of place that makes you look forward to the weekend, even, and especially, if you live here. If you’re looking to maximize the couple days you have off work, make sure to hit up these Seattle-musts!

Eat. Drink.

Photo: Russell Bernice/Flickr Creative Commons

Photo: Russell Bernice/Flickr Creative Commons

Vendemmia: This upscale Italian brunch spot is everything you want – iconic eats, local-sourced ingredients and made-from-scratch condiments that you want to bottle and take home. Try the pork and fennal sausage with bacon jam. It’s a real treat.

Neon Taco: No, it’s not authentic – it’s the Pacific Northwest guys – but it’s delicious, and it’s the most perfect hangover food you can ask for. Not only do they serve amazing tacos, but you can also order hipster-approved items like baked eggs, torta benedict and frozen, boozy drinks.

The Walrus and The Carpenter: This local oyster bar serves delicious, fresh shellfish in a comfortable, relaxed atmosphere. Don’t leave until you try the maple bread pudding!

Dick’s Deluxe: Dick’s is a Seattleite staple. It’s a spot you have to go when the world is spinning from too much local beer (or when you can’t sit up straight after eating a brownie one of your new friends let you try). Go there around midnight to experience it in all of its glory.

Little Water Cantina: If you’re looking for a spot to day drink, look no further. Not only has it been voted the best Mexican food in Seattle, it features an awesome patio and cozy lounge complete with TVs and a 24-foot bar. It’s also decked out with over 800 tequila bottles that have been borrowed from the dumpsters of a bunch of Mexican restaurants, so that’s something.

The Unicorn Bar: Located atop of Capitol Hill, this carnival-style dive bar features Unicorn balls, Unicorn Jizz and other Unicorn-inspired monstrosities. Oh, and deep-fried Snickers, in case you needed extra incentive. While you visit, you can borrow one of their famous Unicorn helmets, take photos in a retro photo booth or play old-school arcade games.

Treat.

Photo: thedieline

Photo: thedieline.

Hot Cakes Molten Chocolate Cakery: Boozy shakes, chocolate cakes that explode with hot fudge and incredible coffee blends made with Blue Star Coffee are just a few things on the menu that have Seattleites going nuts. Try the smores chocolate chip cookie for a flawless blend of sweet, salty, fluffy and gooey perfection.

Bakery Nouveau: Known for their unique desserts, you won’t be disappointed with this local spot. They use local ingredients to produce beautiful, seasonal treats that can satisfy even the most intense sweet tooth.

Explore.

Photo: Jim Moore/Flickr Creative Commons

The Seattle Arboretum: One of the prettiest parks you ever will see. Take our word for it.

Mt. Rainier: The Mount Rainier National Park is available year-round and considered one of the snowiest places on earth! If you’re lucky enough to see it when the ice has melted – usually around August or September – you’ll find lush, green meadows, fields of wildflowers and a spectacular view of the city you just left.

La Conner: La Conner is a tiny town located in the Skagit Valley of Washington, about an hour from Seattle. It’s full of art galleries, local shops, bookstores and museums that are a must-see if you’re in the area. Take a walk along the recently updated waterfront boardwalk for a relaxing day on the water.

Whidbey Island: Known affectionately as Seattle’s “Mussel Beach,” here you can see the iconic historic structures of old-world Seattle, taste fresh shellfish everywhere you go and take in the ocean views.

Snoqualmie Falls: If you’re the outdoorsy type, you can’t miss the Snoqualmie Falls. Drawing more than 1.5 million visitors a year, the 270-foot waterfall overlooks a gushing, snowmelt river. You can hike the base of the falls, or head to the observation deck to take in the views.