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CES 2015 VIDEO: Modeling Tomorrow with 3D Printing

We've got awesome footage of the industry's best who are looking to go mainstream.

John VanderSchuitby John VanderSchuit

Many of you may not know much about 3D printing, aside from the fact that it exists. Admit it, it’s likely you probably saw a piece written about it in your favorite tech publication and dismissed it as a hobbyist’s wet dream or the medical industry’s new play thing to make really elaborate and expensive prosthetics.

The truth is, 3D printing has been around for decades. It started in a very clumsy and large way, sorta like old beastly computers. As the years go by, however, we are seeing the printers shrink in size, the cost of raw materials decline, access to (and consequently, sharing of) digital printing blueprints made easier, increased return on investment, as well as potential applications growing exponentially.

CraveOnline spent some time with the industry’s best to really delve deeper into this infinitely useful tech and get a good look at what’s coming our way now and in the coming years:

As you can see, it’s getting to the point now where you can literally name just about anything…and find a digital blueprint or a 3D model of it that’s already been made. I would put a comprehensive list of items that are commonly 3D printed nowadays, but then you’d be reading a ten-page editorial. Ain’t nobody got time for that! Let’s just say, that because of industry evolution and growth, 3D printing is now a big hit in the following fields:

  • Computer Science
  • Medical prosthetics
  • Consumer Electronics
  • Fitness
  • Home decor
  • Home living
  • Toys
  • Bioprinting (yes, that’s what you think it is, and it’s incredible)

What would you print first if you had one of these incredible machines? I would probably make this and go for brisk walk while considering what else to make.

Thanks for reading, and if you missed the event last week, check out the rest of what was seen in Las Vegas at our CES 2015 hub.

 
Photo: Getty
Camera: Peter Acosta, James Armstrong; Video Editor: Peter Acosta.