‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Gets Pushed Back To Spring 2017

The next 'Star Trek' series won't be coming in January, as Bryan Fuller and his team ask for more time to work on the show before its premiere.

Blair Marnellby Blair Marnell

While there still haven’t been any casting announcements about Star Trek: Discovery, the first new Star Trek series in over a decade was still expected to premiere in January 2017. At least it was until yesterday. But now, fans are gonna have to wait even longer for Discovery to premiere.

According to Deadline, Star Trek: Discovery showrunner and executive producer Bryan Fuller requested a delay for the premiere. The new tentative time frame is that the 13 episode first season of Discovery will premiere on CBS in May 2017, with the weekly series following on the subscription streaming service, CBS All Access.

In a joint statement, Fuller and producer Alex Kurtzman said “bringing Star Trek back to television carries a responsibility and mission: to connect fans and newcomers alike to the series that has fed our imaginations since childhood. We aim to dream big and deliver, and that means making sure the demands of physical and post-production for a show that takes place entirely in space, and the need to meet an air date, don’t result in compromised quality. Before heading into production, we evaluated these realities with our partners at CBS and they agreed: Star Trek deserves the very best, and these extra few months will help us achieve a vision we can all be proud of.”

Related: Bryan Fuller Talks About ‘Star Trek: Discovery’s’ Lead Character

And how much of the series has already been completed? Deadline’s report indicates that only three scripts have been completed and the first season’s arc has been planned out. Considering the special effects involved with bringing Star Trek‘s universe to life and the still unfinished casting for the show, it doesn’t seem like a January premiere was very realistic in the first place. At least Fuller and Kurtzman seemed to recognize that rushing the series out would have been problematic.

“The series template and episodic scripts that Alex and Bryan have delivered are incredibly vivid and compelling,” added CBS TV Studios president David Stapf. “They are building a new, very ambitious Star Trek world for television, and everyone involved supports their vision for the best timing to bring to life what we all love on the page.”

Here’s hoping that Discovery can live up the lofty expectations of the network and the fans. We have a lot of faith in Fuller and his vision for the series, and we’re eager to see where he takes Star Trek.

What do you want to see in Star Trek: Discovery? Is the delay ultimately a good thing? Share your thoughts below!

Photo Credit: CBS All Access