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Player Points Cap Fails The NBL Again In Massingale Move

CJ Massingale’s tale is another example of how US athletes often get the raw end of the deal when they head overseas.

US import CJ Massingale should be a Wildcat now. Instead he’s jobless.

Massingale, a product of the University of Washington’s basketball program, was last week axed by the NBL’s Adelaide 36ers because he allegedly hadn’t met the club’s demands. Wanted by the Wildcats on the other side of the country, Massingale could remain jobless as the NBL’s player points cap threatens to claim another name.

The 36ers have revelled in mediocrity this season with just a 5-5 record, but when Massingale’s cheap contract was axed it came as a surprise, especially when his coach publically threw him under the bus.

Adelaide coach Marty Clarke had a number of bad taste comments for Massingale, labelling him as one dimensional player who couldn’t do much more than “catch and shoot”.

That wasn’t fair said Massingale. A veteran of seven seasons in the minor Australian SEABL competition, the guard was finally given an NBL opportunity with the 36ers this season and tore up the preseason competition. However, he soon saw his minutes severely diminished and says he wasn’t given a fair go. Averaging just 4 points in less than 10 minutes per game, Massingale is obviously capable of much more.

“From Day One, they (Clarke and assistant Mark Radford) told me they didn't need a dynamic import,” said Massingale.

“I was told to run to the corner, spread the offence for the big guys, then catch-and-shoot when I was open.

“They never said I should look to penetrate or to dish.

“I was told we have three point guards (Jason Cadee, Adam Gibson, Nathan Crosswell) to create off the dribble so `space the floor, get your feet ready, catch-and-shoot'.

“I accepted the new role, which was less than what is expected of me in SEABL.

“From Day One, they (Clarke and assistant Mark Radford) told me they didn't need a dynamic import. I was told to run to the corner, spread the offence for the big guys, then catch-and-shoot when I was open. They never said I should look to penetrate or to dish.

“I was told we have three point guards (Jason Cadee, Adam Gibson, Nathan Crosswell) to create off the dribble so `space the floor, get your feet ready, catch-and-shoot'. I accepted the new role, which was less than what is expected of me in SEABL.”

To further top off Massingale’s awful experience, his contract was worth just $37,000, he had to pay his own insurance and the club didn’t even house him.

Now championship contenders Perth are calling on Massingale’s services, but he might not even get the chance to play for them.

The Wildcats lost veteran point guard Brad Robbins recently to early retirement and were regardless in desperate need of some perimeter help since MVP Kevin Lisch is experiencing a regression of sorts in 2012-13.

Because Massingale is ranked a league maximum 10 points of the league’s 'player point ranking', the Wildcats would need to release a player to make it work. Massingale is currently appealing his ranking with the NBL.

Australian Boomer David Barlow, coming off an Olympic campaign in London, recently spoke out against the player ranking system saying many of Australia’s top talent, who go off to play in Europe seeking bigger contracts, would come home for the security if the league were to abolish its system.

Barlow believes the system takes away security for players in Australia and also said he would return if it was abolished.

Crave has Australian sport covered.

Follow Robert White on Twitter @RobertWhitebrrr.